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Aussie Tie Ring or The Clip?
   
   
   
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Blocker Tie Ring or The Clip?  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: Wed Dec 7th, 2011 04:05 pm
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Lakota
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Noellee, I wouldn't just hobble at trail breaks as I think they will learn to move around too much which I feel would be a bad habit. I would always tie a rein to the hobbles and a rein to the fork so they can't move around so much. (Train for this at home first of course). Also, I wouldn't mess with hobbles at all if there are trees to tie to. I just do it if there's no place to tie up. I may hobble while tied though if the horse is getting pi$$y and starts in to pawing. (Of course, only if the horse is well broke to them).

Like you, I have found the rope halter to solve a lot of 'stupid' issues with my horses. They learn that acting foolish while tied doesn't pay after one or two times, and they are teaching themselves, not getting reprimanded by us.

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 Posted: Wed Dec 7th, 2011 02:10 pm
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slipslider
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Noellee. I don't know if you have RFDTV but if so, there are clinicians on there all the time showing how they hobble.

You can also google and read about hobbling as well as youtube. I always watch and read as much as possible. As with anything no one trainer does it exactly the same. And they will all use different types of hobbles. So I just pick the one that I like best and go with that one.

It also helps if you have an area with soft footing, but not completely necessary.

As with anything that is new to me. I start out very slowly. Trainers may do it all in a matter of minutes, but they know what they are doing as they have done this many times with many horses.

When it is knew to me, I will do one step at a time, until I am sure horse understands and is accepting before continuing with the next step.

Some horses will take to this quickly, others may freak out. But if you do it slowly step by step, the horse should not have a problem with it.

I start out by taking a soft cotton or similar material, make a loop that will release easily and put that around a front ankle (correct terminology does not come to me at the moment). Put some tension on it and ask the horse to step forward. Like leading horse forward by the leg. When horse does so without much notice, then go to next front foot and do the same. Can even do this with the back legs as well. This will help the horse get use to something around the foot restricting the movement and you can judge your horses reaction before actually hobbling. When the horse accepts this, then I will proceed with actually hobbling. Always starting with front legs first. Some will then teach hobbling the back legs as well. But i have not done that.

I believe this method is used by either Craig Cameron or Ken McNabb. I like going slowly as this method does.

That is just a quick outline of what i do. See if you can find there methods and read up on it.

Make sure you fully understand how they teach hobbling before doing it. If you don't understand it, you can't teach it.

Have not looked but Julie Goodnight may teach as well. She has a website and is on facebook as well. Her website has a place where she shares many training tips so you may find it there as well. I have not looked at her method, but like many of her teachings as well. So that might be a good place to check as well.

PS: when I got my blocker tie ring, I got the short video that came with it teaching how to properly use it. Again youtube or Clinton's site may have it there as a demonstration. I know i have seen it many times in different places. So again google it. There is even a site for the Blocker tie ring and think it is there as well. Clinton was the first professional trainer to endorse so he sells it. But a man named blocker invented it and has his own site with info about it.

Let me know if you have trouble finding it and I will look for you. Got to get to work now.

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 Posted: Wed Dec 7th, 2011 01:21 pm
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NOELLEE
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Wow, great thread on tying up horses... I have both the clip and tie ring, and never figured how to use either! I use the quick release tie knot and rope halters.

When I first saw Bo, one of my QHs, he would suddenly pull back strongly when tied to a tree or hitch and try to break away.  His prior owner tied him in a regular halter on the trail with a lead rope and tied him solid.  Once he was my horse, I used a rope halter and quick release knot.  He only pulled back on me once when tied to a tree, and I released the tie so quickly, he calmed right down.  Never done it again in the last 3 yrs.  He stands quiet all the time now.

I admit to getting lazy of late... I have been letting all three of my horses, even TWH Rain, just park at a tree, no tie up or hobble.  Someone please smack me and teach me how to hobble!!  I need to study all the posts here again :D.

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 Posted: Wed Dec 7th, 2011 02:03 am
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Lakota
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I use a two horse straight load and I had a horse try to turn around and got stuck that way. This was when I was unloading, could've been real bad if it happened while untied in transit.

Another thing, if the door latch fails you might end up with your horse on the interstate at 70 m.p.h. I'm sure the people driving behind you wouldn't appreciate that. If they are tied I know they are where they're supposed to be.:w2

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 Posted: Tue Dec 6th, 2011 09:56 pm
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slipslider
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I rememeber that post Karen. I know he could box off for his horses and I believe you have a two horse trailer. This is fine with some horses, but can be a problem with others. I once had a smaller horse in a 2 horse trailer. Who knew she could get her head down between her legs, with a manger in front! and then was stuck that way.

I see horses in cattle type trailers and they are loose and seem to ride fine. So I tried that once. Warning: Do not leave horses loose, especially if you have three of them and do not close the heaviest horse in the front. Too much weight on the back leads to trouble. Luckily I realized this quickly and before starting out.

Always put heaviest horses up front or if 2 horse, put the heaviest or if only onne on driver side.

I just feel better with mine tied. Afraid of them trying to do something really stupid if untied. But again that is why I feel more comfortable tying with the blocker.

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 Posted: Tue Dec 6th, 2011 09:03 pm
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karenlexsc
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We used to tie ours in the trailer until I read a comment by the guy that transports for a living on this mb and he said he doesn't tie them in a trailer. Said he could tell us horror stories of horses being tied in trailers. Am sure there are some also for not being tied...but ours do just fine not being tied.

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 Posted: Sun Dec 4th, 2011 04:58 am
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Lakota
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When I hobble mine I tie one rein to the hobbles and one to the fork. They cannot move their head enough to go anywhere this way. Saddlepal, you should post your idea on the tips and tricks thread. Looks like it's simple and should be pretty good.

The U.S. Cavalry used to 'link in couples'. It's fairly similar. They had linkstraps on the bridles with a snap on the end. They would hook it to the cantle ring of another horse and do the same with that horse. Each horses' head was then 'tied' to the others cantle. They wouldn't go anywhere. Probably not for everybody, I can envision some wrecks....:s4 :

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 Posted: Sun Dec 4th, 2011 12:28 am
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sdlepal
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My husbands horse can travel quite well with front hobbles.  Here is a picture showing how we tie our horses on the trail on breaks.  They stand still like this.  If my horse gets too close Jim's horse will put him back in place.

Attachment: php3b1xZ5PM[1].jpg (Downloaded 61 times)



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 Posted: Sat Dec 3rd, 2011 12:06 am
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elisaliv
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I appreciate everyone's responses! I have decided to get the blocker tie rings once we get our horses. Thanks everyone!

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 Posted: Fri Dec 2nd, 2011 05:41 am
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slipslider
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Yes, I also use the blocker for this reason in the trailer. If horse were to go down, the lead will go down as well, so horse would not be stuck with its head up and would be able to get back on its feet. Or if it could not get up, at least his head would be down and not twisted. All you have to do it pull and the rope will come right out. I use a regular lead rope (I think the standard is 6')for trailer use on the blocker tie ring for trailering. The blocker is also excellent to use for cross tying as well. Would not cross tie without it.

I thought the jemal looked good until a friend of mine had one and was using it for her horse, which she was teaching to load. She got him in the trailer and then clipped him to it, he got frightened and pulled back, it released and since then he thinks he can break away when tied, especially when in the trailer. It did not take much pressure for him to pull it out. So my opinion is, it may teach a horse that it can break free way too easily and could create a bad habit quickly. The tie ring want do that and it has many settings, easy, hard, harder, harder, ect.

My vote is still for the blocker ring.

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 Posted: Fri Dec 2nd, 2011 02:01 am
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Rush Creek Farms
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Have any of you used the Blocker Tie or the Clip in a trailer? Have any of you used the Jemal Safety Device? I was reading an article from TheHorse.com on trailer safety and the Jemal Safety device was recommended because the horse can break loose after the incident, but still have a halter on with a short lead rope. (as opposed to a human trying to cut the trailer tie or release a safety snap)

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 Posted: Thu Dec 1st, 2011 10:18 pm
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fireandice
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I have made 2 halters out of 550 cord; strong, thin, and cheap to buy in any army/navy store.

I like a hobble trained horse but just don't do it anymore.  Like karenlexsc, laziness is my only excuse.  Pulling back is one of the few things that really get under my skin , I would resort to quick methods if I had to - it's a very dangerous thing for them to do.  I'd much rather deal with a crow-hopper/bucker/hard-to-catch horse than I had one who pulls back.
T.



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 Posted: Thu Dec 1st, 2011 09:40 pm
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karenlexsc
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We have 2 that must be the same as the Clips.  We love them for tying to the trailer because we are bad and haven't learned to tie good knots (lazy is our only excuse).  But I love the clips because I know they can pull back if they need to.

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 Posted: Thu Dec 1st, 2011 02:44 am
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slipslider
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That rock climbing cord is great. I had a calf rope made out of parachute cord once, loved it.

And yes I do not disagree with using such to teach a horse to tie and once it is ingrained in a horse that they cannot break it, you will likely never have a problem again.

I have taught my horses to hobble too. This is another handy device when needed, for the reason you described as well as teaching one not to fight if hoof or leg becomes trapped.

I unfortunately have not had many chances to use it on trail since i have not gotten to ride a trail that long before as to allow horse to graze. I understand that however that a horse can learn to move quite well with hobbles in time, so your split rein setup is great idea.

Ideally I think the best time to teach a horse to stand tied is when they are still foals. They are not as likely to hurt their selves or their handler, much easier to get in there and help them if they were to get into trouble, it is usually over in a matter of seconds and once that lesson is learned, it is learned. Better then waiting until they are 1000 plus pounds.

Natural ways and aides are great, but you are right, "sometimes you just got to get in there and get your hands dirty!"

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 Posted: Thu Dec 1st, 2011 01:25 am
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Lakota
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Ya, Slip I agree with you about your opinions on the blocker tie ring. It is a great tool for many horse people. I'm just not looking to get into it myself. I would reccomend them to anyone though, if they showed the desire to try it out. I make my own rope halters out of rock climbing cord and tie my newbies/problem horses up with lead ropes that don't have any metal snaps to break. Frankly, they could be tied up with kite string now and wouldn't test it as they have learned good manners.

On the trail if there is no place to tie, I will hobble them and tie one split rein to the hobbles and one to the fork of the saddle. Leaving just a little bit of room for the head to raise/lower keeps them right where I left them.

This is a great poll/thread and I have found all the comments very interesting.:D

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 Posted: Wed Nov 30th, 2011 09:31 pm
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slipslider
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You are right Lakota that everyone should know and be able to use the quick release knot and every horse should learn to stand tied.

I believe the blocker tie ring was invented for those horses that have figured out that if they set back they can break just about anything and/or young horses just learning to stand tied. As this device is great for any horsemen, experienced or novice. I also use it when I am doing something that may cause the horse to spook, less risk of injury to me or the horse, if it's flight responses kick in.

There are halters with leads made in them that will not break and many have used these to teach hard to tie horses to stand tied. But these have also resulted in injury to horse and handler.

I like to use tie ring in trailer, in case something happens and horse were to go down, he would be able to get his head down so he could get back on feet and would not result in injury, as it undoubtedly would if he were tied.  Also like to use it in wash rack, so if horse spooks, again less likely a injury to horse or handler.

So you are right it does have its place and usefulness, this is just up to each individual, but I have found it a very handy tool to have around.

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 Posted: Wed Nov 30th, 2011 08:25 pm
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Lakota
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I have never used either one and have no plans to. It is just so much simpler to tie a good quick release knot. Less crap to carry on the trail as well. I like to train my horses to tie with a rope halter. They hit that a time or two and learn the parameters of their available space at the hitching rail. No problems.

Having said that, I have seen Clinton Anderson use the blocker tie ring on extremely spoiled problem horses with great success and there is a place for these. I respect that but I teach mine how to stand tied early and avoid having pullback horses in the first place. So I would say if you want to get one, go for it. You will be happy with it. The clip looks like a bulky old inconvenient peice of unnecessary equipment. That's my $0.02:D.

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 Posted: Tue Nov 29th, 2011 06:08 pm
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slipslider
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I have both and I like the tie ring the best. It is much easier to use and I certainly think it would work better for the training aspect.

I find the clip much harder to use. About the only thing it is more convenient for is connecting it to the lead and just clipping it into the trailer and then clipping it to the outside as well, but I found it harder to get the rope where it is suppose to go and then making it stay there. I have not had a horse to pull back while using it, but not sure it would work that well.

I have complete confidence in the tie ring. I do not have the magnet ones as I bought mine before they came out, but for the price difference it does not matter to me, it works just as well and i have had no problem with them at all.

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 Posted: Tue Nov 29th, 2011 05:32 pm
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fireandice
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Pam:  I use the quick release knot all the time too :D  It's so quick and easy.  When I am trail riding though and Stroker's tied to the trailer or to something else, I will make several quick-tie knots so that it is not easy to un-due.  Being 'married' to a  Houdini like Stroker, you can never be too careful and I never leave him completely unwatched for any extended period of time.  He does keep me on my toes, lol!
T.



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 Posted: Tue Nov 29th, 2011 05:22 pm
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sdlepal
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I use both the reg. Aussie tie ring and the one with the magnet  I tie  my yearling up to them and she just stands there.  If she is there long enough she will eventually lengthen the rope.  I like the one with the magnet better because you only have to wrap the rope around once and it does the job.  My husband gets after me all the time for tying a quick release knot, it always comes untied.



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